The Post Christmas Blitz on Lee Part 2 – 29 December 1940

In the first part of this post we looked at the post-Christmas Luftwaffe attacks on 27 December 1940 on Lee which saw numerous bombs dropped and homes destroyed on Aislibie Road, the misspelled road, named after Benjamin Aislabie – slave owner, awful cricketer and tenant of Lee Place.

While there was a lull the following evening, it seems that the Luftwaffe were just gearing up for an even bigger raid on 29 December, the aim of which seems to have been to put the fire services under a level of pressure that they would be unable to cope with and see London burning.

The attacks were much more concentrated in a small number of streets between Lee High Road and and Manor House Gardens. Most were incendiaries, and along with a few high explosive bombs, were dropped in a few minutes around 8:15 pm.

As we found with the post on the first night of the Blitz, it is worth remembering that not every incident was reported to the Air Raid Precautions (ARP), some being just reported to the Fire Brigade but others never going through official channels. One of the pages of incidents for the night of 29/30 December 1940 is show below.

The first attacks of the night in Lee started at around 7:25 pm in Blessingham Road, when a high explosive bomb hit the back garden of number 38. Elsewhere on the street another high explosive bomb injured two people. The street was to be decimated by a series of V-1 flying bombs later in the war and was developed, initially as prefabs, and in the early 1960s, as the Mercator Estate.

Fifty minutes later, Lee was on fire, the ARP logs note several dozen incendiaries being dropped at the same time, so we’ll look at the attack on a street by street basis. Aislibie Road (pictured below) which had suffered badly two nights before, was again hit. It was different houses this evening with 5, 13, 26, 30 and 39 all being bombed with roofs and upper floors damaged by the incendiary bombs, none were destroyed though.

Parallel to Aislibie Road, and the location of a devastating V-1 flying bomb three and a half years later, is Lenham Road which saw 5, 7, 10 and 28 all hit by incendiaries. The fires were successfully dealt with by local ARP and Fire Wardens.

Incendiary bombs rained down on neighbouring Brightfield Road with 32, 34, 42, 43, 49, 63 and 83 all hit by them (some are pictured below) – the fires were put out by wardens and the inhabitants, but many of the roofs were damaged.

Elsewhere in the neighbourhood, the roof and upper floors of 24 Lampmead Road were damaged, as was 4 Hedgley Street. Taunton Road saw at least two attacks – number 60 was slightly damaged and 2 Thornhill Cottages saw its roof damamged. Thornhill Cottages was a terrace at the eastern end of Taunton Road between Burnt Ash Road and Hedgley Street seemingly on the present Sainsbury’s site.

At the opposite end of Manor House Gardens, 2, 44 and 61 Old Road plus Pentland House (pictured below) were all hit but Fire Wardens managed to deal with all four fires.

A little further along Lee High Road, number 345 was hit by another incendiary; ironically it had been a fire station up until 1906 when the one on Eltham Road opened, it is now a solicitors. The roof seems to have been damaged, and assuming that there was no damage on other occasions during the war, a central turret there was destroyed (there is a pre-damage photograph in the post on the fire station).

There was an explosive and incendiary combination dropped on Dacre Park at the same time and there were ‘several .. casualties in the road’ as a result.

Around fifteen minutes later at 8:30, a high explosive bomb hit Lee High Road between Old Road and Lochaber Road – there 5 casualties, including an ARP warden, with shrapnel damage to almshouses’ boundary wall that is still visible (along with a fading direction sign to an air raid shelter). The ARP warden was Henry Cottell of 41 Manor Lane Terrace who was to die later that evening in Lewisham Hospital – it was a house that seems to have been lost to the construction of Wolfram Close. Henry left behind two adult daughters and his wife Ann, who were there when the 1939 Register was collected.

Also at 8:30, Chiesman’s store repository at 87 Old Road was hit by a high explosive and incendiary combination – the ARP log noted that the repository was on fire. We’ll return to this incident later in the post.

One of the ARP Fire wardens for that part of Lee that night was Phyllis Noble (later Willmott), who lived at 49 Lampmead Road with her parents and grandparents. In the aftermath of the incendiaries being dropped, she and her brothers, who were also ARP Wardens, grabbed stirrup pumps, buckets and sandbags. ‘Incendiaries seemed to be everywhere, but so too were numerous fire watchers like ourselves.’ (1)

The first fire they dealt with was at the almshouses that stood at the corner Lampmead and Lee High Roads (pictured above) where a room had caught fire. They put out that and another in the neighbouring Methodist church, now the New Testament Church of God. Phyllis and her brothers spent the next few hours putting out fires in locations that didn’t even get a mention in the ARP log chasing ‘up and down stairs in the tall Victorian houses in the High Road.’ They reached Old Road and Chiesman’s Store depository by around midnight (2)

“As the red glow in the sky told us, there were still plenty of fires raging, including one in the furniture depository nearby. We went along to see if there was anything we could do there; giant tongues of red and gold flames were shooting skywards from the glowing building and clearly this was not work for us, in any case the firemen had already arrived.”

Had the Fire Brigade arrived earlier they may have been able to save 87 Old Road but it was largely destroyed.

Lee was probably only a stopping off place for the Luftwaffe as they headed towards the centre of the city. Later in the evening incendiaries rained down on central London in what was described as the Second Great Fire of London, the iconic picture of St Paul’s Cathedral amidst the smoke was from that night as 160 died and hundreds of buildings were destroyed in the capital.

Notes

  1. Phyllis Willmott (1988) Coming of Age in Wartime p50
  2. ibid

Credits

  • Most of the information for this post comes from the Lewisham ARP Log – it is a fascinating document, which is part of the collection of Lewisham Archives. It isn’t a complete record – some incidents were reported to the Fire Brigade rather than the APR and some incendiaries were dealt with by residents or Fire Wardens without ever reaching the ARP service – this is particularly the case on busy nights such as this.
  • The photograph of St Paul’s is via a Wikipedia Commons
  • The photograph of the Boone’s Almshouses and the page of the ARP Log are both from the collection of Lewisham Archives, both are used with permission and remain their copyright.

11 thoughts on “The Post Christmas Blitz on Lee Part 2 – 29 December 1940

  1. Valerie Weber

    Thank you for keeping the story of SELondon’s blitz alive. My memories are secondhand. I only have one cousin left who lived through it, and she’s almost incommunicado in a nursing home.

    Reply
    1. Paul B Post author

      Thank you for your kind words; I think it is an important part of the story of SE London – I want to make sure that the stories in my bit of the area aren’t forgotten I even if memories are now hazy.

      Reply
  2. Colin Sweeney

    Paul, I shared this with my brother who used to work in the museum in Hull. Thought you might be interested in his comments:
    Thanks Colin very interesting. The fire wardens being volunteers probably only had rudimentary training, but its amazing how many fires they were dealing with. Lee is only a small part of London but you can see how much damage was done in 2 nights. In the book on An East coast town (Hull) they say over the whole war 90% of the houses were damaged. After London Hull was the next most bombed city. Most attacks were single planes that couldn’t find their targets but could follow the rivers. Where the Humber meets the Hull they would dump their load and were bound to hit something. Fortunately the Germans didn’t have the size or number of planes to do the damage the RAF was able to do later

    Reply
  3. Carol Sutton

    Is there anything like this for Catford? I looking for info on Morena Street which had 3 bomb sites but they didn’t occur on the first day of blitz and not sure where else to look.

    Reply
    1. Paul B Post author

      Hi Carol
      The only sources for this data are personal memories, the Fire Brigade records which seem to be held by the London Metropolitan Archives and the local ARP Log which is held by Lewisham Archives. Some is digitised via Bombsight but without dates (it wouldn’t refresh when I looked for Morena St but try again later). The rest is a manual process looking through the sometimes confusing ARP Logs. I am not aware of this having been done in the rest of Lewisham. I will keep a mental note to look out for Morena Street when I am going through my copies of pages for other posts and let you know if I find anything.
      Paul

      Reply
  4. JaneJohnston

    My father was from Hull and told me about their bombs and destruction ..his family relocated to the Yorkshire countryside while my Grandfather was away and eventually arrived at Dunkirk My father then came to Guys as a medical student and when his digs were bombed out in Blackheath he spent the night at the feet of General Wolf s statue.Luckily he survived the war unscathed despite dodging bombs in both locations !

    Reply
    1. Paul B Post author

      What happened in this area was mirrored in cities up and down the country; parallels with Hull were made by someone else in relation to this post too.

      Reply
  5. Andrew Stern

    Is there a problem with the link to Part 1 of this blog? I have read it and shared with many friends, but now the link seems to be broken and nor can I see a link to that piece in the list of contents. Thanks

    Reply
    1. Paul B Post author

      Thanks for letting me know – WordPress was doing some strange things a couple of days ago and it seems to have reverted to a pre-publication draft of that post. I’ll try and sort out this afternoon.

      Reply
  6. Pingback: The Post Christmas Blitz on Lee Part 1 – 27 December 1940 | Running Past

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